Sunday, 1 March 2020

Charlton Slopes

It's always fantastic when you get to fill out a full door spread with fanlight, side fanlights, side panels and door panels! This beautiful Edwardian home only had the horizontal door panel remaining from the original set of 3 door panels and one central fan. Much of the original street design remains along the street and curiously the style appears to be that none of the side panels were made into stained glass. It is strange as when it is a full set the hallway looks so much larger. It's possible that the builders money ran out, stained glass was often the victim of declining budgets. Fortunately for this job the central panels lent themselves well to being adapted for new designs for the side panels. It was also brilliant to be able to fill in the fanlight scroll with a house name, so many of these were left blank so that the new owner could fill in their chosen names but maybe it's just one of those jobs that is low down on the list of priorities, I think it really adds to the interest and charm of a house!

All that was left from the original door set.

Full house!

Panels made using vintage Muranese glass from my stock of old glasses. Copies of the original street style birds painted by Flora Jamieson.

External view showing the effect of the textures of lead and glass with decorative brickwork. 

Painted scroll using an Art Nouveau font.

Monday, 27 January 2020

Holocaust Memorial at Woolwich Town Hall

“Auschwitz is outside of us, but it is all around us, in the air. The plague has died away, but the infection still lingers and it would be foolish to deny it. Rejection of human solidarity, obtuse and cynical indifference to the suffering of others, abdication of the intellect and of moral sense to the principle of authority, and above all, at the root of everything, a sweeping tide of cowardice, a colossal cowardice which masks itself as warring virtue, love of country and faith in an idea.”
Primo Levi

Friday, 17 January 2020

Matching Up in South Norwood

Many late Victorian / Edwardian properties have beautiful doors with shaped head apertures and fine decorative moulding. It's wonderful when people treasure these old doors and they are an absolute pleasure to work on. The apertures seem made for stained glass yet often they are infilled with pretty colours of textured glass - Muranese was a popular choice of glass as it has a deep cut making it a lively glass that catches the light but also has good obscurity. I have a theory that as one of the last items to go into the house stained glass was a luxury and if the builder's money was running out, pretty coloured panes would do just as well.

We are lucky that a glass so popular in the Victorian era is still made now, although the colours are paler and the pattern flatter. When a pane breaks it can be hard to match up.


One solution is to make new panels that build in some of the original colours and glasses. In this door set we used a classic Victorian boxed quarry pattern that was simple and would not overwhelm the existing glass.

Victorian boxed quarry pattern.

Photo courtesy of John Coulter.

A mixture of old glass from stock and new glasses were used to help blend in... And the original panes given a good clean up!

Photo courtesy of John Coulter.

One smart door!

The old amber mismatched glass does not get wasted and will be recycled on many jobs to come. Here are a few close ups from the first of these below....






A Magical Night in The Gambia

The customer wanted to recreate in glass a magical moment in time - a beautiful night spent in a rowing boat under a full moon in The Gambia and started to sketch...

Baobub Tree

Moon with strange double halo

Photos courtesy of Jon Shenoy.


The sketch became a finished work...
which translated well to cut lining...


A mix of Textured glasses were chosen to reflect the silvery shimmering of the shell beach and the strange glow of the moon.

Panel leaded and ready to solder

Snow in The Gambia during cementing!



A splash of colour and happy memories at the top of the stairs!

And an album cover to boot!




Saturday, 4 January 2020

Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race 1865

A beautiful scale model of the boat used in the 1865 Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race needed new 'ends' making where sadly the glass was damaged. 

Photos courtesy of Mathew Mazhuvanchery




The good news was that it created an opportunity for some stained glass panels.


Two new panels were made using a mix of hand made glasses in a variety of tints...





And fitted in to both ends of the case...



Oxford won the boat race by 4 lengths in a time of 21 minutes and 24 seconds. The race was considered "one of the most sensational races in this history"